YAG following Cataract Surgery

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My Mom had the YAG laser done yesterday in one eye(she had Cataract Surgery 10 months ago)

Her right eye has been blurry since 2 weeks after the surgery. Yesterday afternoon she had the YAG done. This morning her vision is still blurry as if nothing was done. The Doctor made it sound like her vision would be clear in an hour. I looked around online and it does not say anywhere that the vision is better in an hour. I would appreciate any input on your experience with this procedure.

How long before you could see better? 

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  • Posted

    I had cataracts removed from both eyes 5 months ago.After surgery on my right eye it became cloudy in 2 days.I was schedule an appointment to check my right eye and prepare me for the left eye.When he checked my right eye which I just had surgery on ,I could only read the first line at the top of the eye chart,I was not very impressed,I could see further down the chart without the cataracts removed.Anyway he tells me I would need YAG and it would clear it up and scheduled me for my left eye surgery in three weeks  and the Yag treatment in four weeks on my right eye.After the left eye surgery it was cloudy and blurry even worst than the right eye with a black rim in the corner of my eye,which he came would go away in 4 months.The YAG treatment didn't do anything for me on my right eye and I refused to have the left eye done ,for fear he would make it worst.So after all of this I am into full time glasses,not what I expected.Mabye the YAG treatment will work for you.

     

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  • Posted

    Wow, that is hard to understand as YAG just involves removing the cloudy part of the capsule right behind the lens which should make things clearer.  I am considering YAG as well so this concerns me but from what I have researched YAG offers almost immediate improvement in clarity of vision when done correctly.  However, it can cause floaters until the small pieces of the capsule that may remain float to the bottom of the eye which can take some time. I am hoping others on here who have had YAG can share their experiences as well and hopefully your situation will improve with time.
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    • Posted

      Hi John ,you are correct in saying that YAG treatment is suppose to remove the cloudiness on the back of the lens which I was lead to believe also.The surgeon told me on the follow up checkup the next they after surgery that I was one line away from 20/20 vision,which I felt very impressed with.The next day the cloudiness/blurriness started.I wasn't to concerned at the time thinking it was the steroid drops or the other drops they prescribed for me.after 4 days things were not improving ,so I go back to him again to see what the issue was.He told me that during and after the cataract surgery there was still fragrant left on the outside of the lens ,which migrated to the center of the lens causing the cloudiness. With having the YAG treatment preformed he told me it would clear it up ,but it didn't improve my sight at all ,it's still cloudy and blurry and I see double vision at times.

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  • Posted

    Hi Julie - when you say my mom’s vision has been blurry since 2 weeks out do you mean for 2 weeks after cataract surgery she had crisp clear vision?   

    Or was it always blurry?

    If always blurry it may have been due to other reasons than PCO.  Could be wrong power calculation, astigmatism (cataract surgery itself can cause it even if none present prior to surgery).

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    • Posted

      After my Mom's Cataract Surgery her vision was clear for a couple of weeks. The doctor said she developed PCO and that it was no problem and that the YAG would correct it. She had laser Cataract Surgery and the astigmatism(she supposedly had) would be corrected with the laser.

      I have learned alot from this experience and I now know the doctor is only allowed to charge a Medicare patient if they implant a specialty lens(which she did not get) or say there is an astigmatism(which I do not even know she had for sure). All I care about now is her current vision after the YAG yesterday afternoon.

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  • Posted

    I know someone who had Yag for PCO after refractive lens exchange (meaning she didn't even have cataracts, but had surgery to remove her eye's natural lens without cataracts and replace it with an artificial lens, same exact procedure as cataract surgery) and wound up with floaters so bad that she had what's called a "floaters-only" vitrectomy in both eyes and that made her vision even worse (the floaters are gone, but it left her with other problems). She's also at risk for retinal detachment after the vitrectomy (done in both eyes).

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    • Posted

      I do know they use different methods to get rid of PCO when they do yag (cruciate pattern vs circular pattern - google it). I recall someone on here a while ago mentioned you should make sure your doctor uses the cruciate method to avoid the capsule remnant causing floaters.
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    • Posted

      So it's possible the blurriness is being caused by remnants of the capsule. I think in that case the yag will have to be done again.

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    • Posted

      Thanks for that bit of info Andi.  I am a year out from my surgeries and haven’t seen signs of PCO but will tuck this away for future if and when I do face it.  Was told 25% of people get PCO but again that depends on the site and doctor you are visiting as some say that percentage is higher.   Appreciate that info.
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    • Posted

      You're welcome Sue - and the floaters she got were caused by a PVD (posterior vitreous detachment) in both eyes after the refractive lens exchange and yag. Most people get PVDs by a certain age, but not everyone notices them. Also, you can have a PVD without having had yag and many people get them after cataract surgery.

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    • Posted

      And actually her floaters may have been caused by PVDs in both eyes in addition to the yag itself, I'm not sure.

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    • Posted

      I just found an article "Comparison of two Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy: cruciate pattern vs circular pattern with vitreous strand cutting" where it says the following, so I guess there are trade-offs to both methods since the cruciate method can damage the IOL by causing pitting:

      "Several techniques have been described for Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy. The most popular is the cruciate pattern (or cross pattern), which is easy to learn and has a short procedure time[6]. However, the procedure can damage the IOL, involving the visual axis and inducing glare due to the posterior capsule remnant[6]. The circular pattern (or can-opener method) is also a widely used technique, which has the advantage that it does not make IOL pits in the visual axis. However, this procedure can lead to a floating posterior capsule remnant that can cause floaters[6]."

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    • Posted

      And to me, that 25% number can't be right, since from all I have read online after following people's cataract surgery or refractive lens exchange surgery stories, it seems like 90% of them are told they need yag for PCO after, whether their vision is blurry or not, regardless of age (since supposedly the younger you are the more likely you'll get PCO - how about Jillie's mother?). Unless there's some other motive for telling people they need yag....

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    • Posted

      Well I certainly won’t be inquiring about it unless vision becomes waxy (that’s surgeon described it to me). However if one enjoys good vision and then it becomes blurry you kind of have to investigate and take your chances with a YAG if it is PCO.

      I just can’t figure how it can occur with days or weeks of surgery - I would be tempted to wait as it could be other causes.

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    • Posted

      Sue I was told by the surgeon ,that when he performed the cataract surgery,where they are suppose to vacuum/suck out the the cataract,a lot of times there is fragrance left behind at the outer edge of the lens implant.Where as it can migrate to the center of the lens causing it to become cloudy/blurry. By punching a hole in the back of the lens is suppose to let more light through,the procedure had no effect on my eye before and after the fact.

       

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    • Posted

      Wonder if that speaks to the skill of a surgeon - aren’t they supposed to ensure no fragments left behind?    also that’s where square edge IOLs are said to be better than round edge ones to prevent those side fragments from migrating over the capsule.
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