11 months post op

Posted , 8 users are following.

This discussion has been locked due to a period of inactivity. Start a new discussion

Hi all,

11 months post op today for A&P repairs.

Repairs are holding up, interior walls thickened up through using estriol. Occasional problems due to scar tissue; can be nippy and painful so still have to be careful not to rush about or overstretch when walking.

Doing about 30 each of fast and long hold pelvic floor exercises per day. Not managing my swimming just now but have started some low impact exercise at home and gently building it up to try and gently work the scar tissue.

Not managing the long faster paced walks that I was doing after 1st repair, but then posterior repair can take longer to recover from and I went back to work much quicker this time so maybe I didn't take long enough out this time, so much slower progress.

Still only doing my 2 x 5 hour contract shifts, most overtime only available on self's can area and can't take the long time on my feet. Would ask for any shifts coming up on seat at checkouts but most seats broken or unsuitable so waiting for new seats before pushing for extra shifts.

Managing most things around the house but avoiding any heavy spring cleaning, managing short periods of hoeing in garden but again nothing heavy; bit of a pain trying to avoid bending too often.

Toilet wise all systems working as they should, still wear a thin pad at work or going out 'just in case' but no accidents at all.

Occasionally get that dull achy pain deep in vag... towards the back, not really sure what it is except get it when been on my feet more than couple of hours, sitting too long, or if lifted something too heavy. It's the things that you would normally class as not light but not particularly heavy; you think you'll be OK and turns out it'd heavier than you think.

I suppose I am lucky that these repairs are good especially as the say 2nd repairs have less chance of success. I also have to remember that I am coming up for 57 and been through menopause therefor getting older and as my peers keep reminding me even they can't do as much as they would like to. I'm so use to being able to start and finish projects in a no-time , and going for a short walk meant a good few miles.

So suppose I really just have to accept a more sedentary lifestyle and do a little bit of everything now and again.

Anyway hope you are all well and recovering well, remember to keep up with PF exercises. Soon be spring and hopefully some warm sun.

Hope everyone awaiting surgery receives their date soon.

Happy healing,

Phyl, x ?💖

3 likes, 50 replies

Report

50 Replies

Prev Next
  • Posted

    Awww that's really positive and fantastic to how you are recovering - thank you for that x

    Report
    • Posted

      Thank you Donna, I do hope that ladies do find comfort from my experience in the realization that although it is a long recovery we all eventually get theready in the end.

      X ☺

      Report
  • Posted

    Well done Phyl. Good positive attitude. It's hard adjusting to doing less but better than more surgery. Best wishes xx

    Report
    • Posted

      I was advised after my AR never to lift anything heavy again. Once you have had one prolapse there is a chance that you may have another as the pelvic floor is weak so you have to be careful.
      Report
    • Posted

      Thank you I'm not a doctor,

      Been really difficult over psst few months had such hope that I'd be further along.

      Usually at this time of year I get quite depressed and time goes much slower, but you know what thus year time seems to have passed much quicker.

      Maybe because we have not had such a bad winter and my spring bulbs have come up earlier this year. I have also booked our main holiday much earlier so looking forward to that too. Maybe I'm getting use to relaxing more too, and you are right 'better than more surgery' . I would assume that repeat surgery must have less chance each time so this it it can't afford to take any chances.

      Take care,

      X

      Report
    • Posted

      If I had not had surgery my prolapse would have gotten much worse and eventually would have had to go on the long term sick and probably had to give up my job. I would be limited to very short trips out, unable to go for short walks without being in pain. I have become incontinent unable to reach toilet in the morning flooding on way down the stairs in the morning and my bowel which was not emptying properly and I couldn't seem to wipe clean was getting embarrassing, I was dreading being at work , suddenly needing and being unable to access toilet immediately at work.

      Surgery has at least stopped all that in its tracks and improved things to the point I can function at least in basics. I wish I had taken time to recovery properly in early werks/months the first time round and in later years wish I had not pushed the boundaries of what I knew I could cope with then maybe repair would have lasted longer, I so wanted to continue my lifestyle without too much change.

      As immotadoctor says you have always got to be careful we are all different ages, some of us been through the menopause and some have weak pelvic floors and collagen not so good. We all have to learn what our individual limitations are.

      I personally would think twice now before taking any chances, if this fails again in the future if won't be down to anything I've done this time, unless my work push me to far.

      Take care, and please be careful .

      Phyl x

      Report
    • Posted

      It's definitely getting lighter in the evenings now (although maybe not tonight!) & Spring is just around the corner 🌷.

      I think you were very brave & have done everything right. I know when I eventually have my current prolapse repaired (when I muster up enough courage) I will take more time off work than I did last time. At 53 I don't want to retire yet but I know my body is not what it was. I would never have believed what problems a dodgy pelvic floor can bring!

      Report
    • Posted

      Our parents/grandparents never spoke about it. My mother was fairly active but don't think she had any problems although she wasn't as active as I've been middle age.

      My grandmother was quite sedentary she did a lot of either sitting around or baking pastries, pretty sure it killed all the men off, they all had heart problems, she never ate her pastries and she buried her husband and two sons. Never heard any of them complain; my mum had 4 kids and my gran had 5. Didn't know my mum's mother she died before I was born so don't know the history at all.

      I was always hauling camping equipment about, done thus for years and can remember always feeling like something wasn't right at back end when heading up north in the car. A heavy feeling like I need the toilet at back end yet I didn't need, could never figure it out it settled down after a day or so; looking back mow realize it was the heavy lifting and carrying camping equipment such as large canvas and gas bottles and the like.

      Anyway wish they had warned us better.

      X

      Report
    • Posted

      I'm sure some ladies are able to lift grandchildren after repairs, not in early months but much later once repairs and deep tissues well healed and after physio to strengthen muscles.

      I had been helping my daughter after hysterectomy and AR, in early months when I shouldn't have, she was on maternity level and was with her quite a lot, didn't mean to lift kids but when they put themselves in danger you lift them away instinctively. You've done it before you realize. I could easily lift them on to my knee by Sitting first and sliding them up my leg on to my knee without doing damage, or sitting on floor with them. But was really painful when I lifted them without thinking.

      Needed someone their if baby sitting, to lift them in and out pram or highchair. Couldn't push pram uphill till much later months.

      Phyl x

      Report
    • Posted

      If you have a hysterectomy Buster you won't need a uterine prolapse repair because you won't have anything to repair.

      Report
    • Posted

      Are you in the UK? I would check the NHS information page, there is also patient info on here. As far as I know you must be very careful for at least 6 - 8 weeks. After that I would check with your doctor & physiotherapist.

      Report
    • Posted

      I think Buster may be confused. I have replied to her because it sounds as though she is having a hysterectomy in which case recovery is very different and you can lift once recovered.
      Report
    • Posted

      It's not misleading at all Buster. You have a uterine prolapse and your doctor mentioned hysterectomy. That means your uterus is being removed so you will no longer have a prolapse. There is information on this website about hysterectomy.

      Report
    • Posted

      Hi Martin. So the doc told me that if I do a hesterectomy because of my uterus prolapse that I would have a chance of additional prolapse because of the vaginal wall being weak because when you have a uturus prolapse the vaginal wall can come down the vaginal area too,,so when they do the hysterectomy they stitch the vaginal wall up and there is a 30 percent chance of additional kinds of prolapse. So you have to be careful picking up things. I guess if you need a hysterectomy and have no prolapse and you keep your cervix you have a good chance of no further prolapse.
      Report
    • Posted

      Keeping your cervix doesn't make any difference to be honest. If you are going to have a further prolapse it will happen anyway. It's the pelvic floor that protects the bowel and bladder from prolapsing. Having a hysterectomy obviously gets rid of a uterine prolapse because it's the uterus that has prolapsed. A hysterectomy that leaves the cervix is a partial hysterectomy but if they remove the cervix that's a total hysterectomy. I don't know how old you are but some consultants offer to perform an oopherectomy as well. If it's a hysterectomy you are having it doesn't need to be performed by a urogynaecologist.

      Report
    • Posted

      Marton, so even if you have a uterus prolapse of grade 3 and they need to do the stitches to pull wall up a gynecologist would be ok instead of a urogyno?

      Also what do you think about the 30 percent change of after surgery that I could have different kinds of prolapsed?

      Report
    • Posted

      If you have a uterine prolapse that needs repairing then obviously you need a urogynaecologist but if a decision is made to do a hysterectomy then a gynaecologist can perform this. If you have a hysterectomy then there's always a slight possibility of a bladder or bowel prolapse but no more than before a hysterectomy.

      Report
    • Posted

      Thanks Martin. Why do you think the Urogyno said 30 percent chance of additional prolapse. And more than I one said that.
      Report
    • Posted

      I have no idea. Different consultants have different perceptions of how successful surgery is. I suggest you ask them. By the way I'm not Martin.

      Report
    • Posted

      Sorry matron! The hand out they giave is from studies that have been done in the past. I am located in Santa Fe New Mexico. USA
      Report

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up