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Dr Louise Newson

Dr Louise Newson, MRCGP

BSc (Hons) Pathology, MB, ChB (Hons), MRCP, MRCGP, DFFP, FRCGP

Louise qualified from Manchester University in 1994 and is a GP and menopause expert in Solihull, West Midlands.

She is also an editor for the British Journal of Family Medicine (BJFM).

Louise is an Editor and Reviewer for various e-learning courses and educational modules for the RCGP. She writes regular articles for GPonline.com, MIMS Learning and www.OnMedica.net.

Louise has a keen interest on the menopause and HRT and is one of the directors for the Primary Care Women’s Health Forum (www.pcwhf.co.uk). She runs a menopause clinic in Solihull and is a member of the International Menopause Society and the British Menopause Society. Louise works regularly with West Midlands Police and Fire Brigade to provide advice and support regarding menopause in the workplace.

Louise has contributed to healthcare and menopause related articles in many different newspapers and magazines including: The Guardian, Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday, The Telegraph, The Sun, Mirror, Sunday People, Women’s Own, Country Life, Women’s Own, The Lady, Now, Reveal and Heat. She has also been involved various media work; she has given interviews for BBC and ITV News and contributed to the ITV Tonight and ITN Channel 5 programmes on the menopause. She has been interviewed on menopause related health matters on radio stations including Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour, BBC Radio London with Vanessa Feltz and BBC 5 Live and local BBC stations. Louise participated in Embarrassing Bodies Live from the Clinic as one of their regular GPs and also a medical advisor for the series.

Louise’s web presence

Recently contributed to:

Hyperthyroidism
Professional

Many reports in the media about the benefits of treatments present risk results as relative risk reductions rather than absolute risk reductions. This often makes the treatments seem better than they actually are. Here we explain the difference between absolute and relative risk to enable you to make more informed decisions about whether to take a treatment or not.

Feature Image
Hepatitis A
Info leaflet