Left Lower Quadrant Pain - Treatments

Authored by Dr Jacqueline Payne, 08 Jul 2017

Patient is a certified member of
The Information Standard

Reviewed by:
Dr Helen Huins, 08 Jul 2017

There is no single answer to this until you know what the cause of your pain is. See the relevant leaflet for the condition with which you have been diagnosed. Treatments for a few of the causes of left lower quadrant (LLQ) pain are briefly discussed below.

  • Constipation can be treated with medicines, but often changes to your diet are needed to prevent it happening again.
  • Gastroenteritis usually doesn't need any treatment, other than drinking plenty of fluid to compensate for all that is being lost. Occasionally when germs (bacteria) which can be treated with antibiotics are causing the infection, an antibiotic may help.
  • Shingles. The pain and rash settle on their own in time, but some people may be advised to take an antiviral tablet to help speed this process up.
  • Kidney infections are treated with antibiotics. Mild infections can be treated with antibiotics at home. If you are very unwell you may need admission to hospital for antibiotics and fluids through a drip (intravenously).
  • Kidney stones. Small kidney stones pass on their own eventually, in which case you will need to drink plenty of fluids and take strong painkillers. Larger kidney stones may need one of a number of procedures done to break them up or remove them altogether.
  • Torsion of the testicle (testis) is cured with an operation (ideally this should be performed within 6-8 hours of the pain starting).
  • Ectopic pregnancy is usually treated by an operation but medical treatment is now more common. This avoids the need for surgery and means the tube is less likely to be permanently damaged.

Again this depends entirely on the cause of the pain. Some conditions settle very quickly on their own (for example, gastroenteritis), or with the help of antibiotics (for example, a kidney infection). Others can be cured with surgery, such as torsion of the testis. Some are long-term conditions, for which there is no cure, although there are treatments, such as those used for people who have Crohn's disease. Your doctor should be able to give you an idea of the outlook (prognosis) once a diagnosis has become clear.

Further reading and references

  • Cartwright SL, Knudson MP; Evaluation of acute abdominal pain in adults. Am Fam Physician. 2008 Apr 177(7):971-8.

  • Kim JS; Acute Abdominal Pain in Children. Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr. 2013 Dec16(4):219-224. Epub 2013 Dec 31.

  • Cartwright SL, Knudson MP; Diagnostic imaging of acute abdominal pain in adults. Am Fam Physician. 2015 Apr 191(7):452-9.

  • Manterola C, Vial M, Moraga J, et al; Analgesia in patients with acute abdominal pain. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011 Jan 19(1):CD005660. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005660.pub3.

I have been diagnosed with Gastritis via a doctors examination, I havent had any tests.I have a sharp pain under my my rib cage, centre, above my belly button and was throwing up every time I stood...

TheWolverine
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